TGen Leads the Way in Early Detection of Cancer

TGen Leads the Way in Early Detection of Cancer

Currently, less than 15 percent of cancer research funding focuses on early detection, even though intervention at the earliest stages dramatically improves a patient’s chance of survival. Using approaches found nowhere else, TGen scientists are looking at ways in which a simple blood screen could detect cancerous cells early. Their goal: Diagnose cancer in the five- to ten-year window, before it becomes symptomatic through molecular diagnostic tests that detect cancer in its earliest stages. Early detection of cancer and its partner —early intervention— will save lives and improve the quality of life for patients.

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Currently, less than 15 percent of cancer research funding focuses on early detection, even though intervention at the earliest stages dramatically improves a patient’s chance of survival. Using approaches found nowhere else, TGen scientists are looking at ways in which a simple blood screen could detect cancerous cells early.

Their goal: Diagnose cancer in the five- to ten-year window, before it becomes symptomatic through molecular diagnostic tests that detect cancer in its earliest stages. Early detection of cancer and its partner —early intervention— will save lives and improve the quality of life for patients.