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TGen cancer fundraising event moves to Scottsdale

9th annual 'stepNout' is planned Nov. 2 at Scottsdale Sports Complex

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - July 16, 2014 - The 9th annual stepNout Run, Walk Dash, a major fundraising event for pancreatic cancer research at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is moving to the Scottsdale Sports Complex.

More than 1,000 participants have attended stepNout in each of the past few years, and even more are expected to attend this year's morning-long event on Nov. 2 in Scottsdale, featuring fun, competitive races for all ages and abilities, including the event's signature 5K run.

"We are thrilled to announce that our enormously successful stepNout event will come to the City of Scottsdale. By partnering in this new way with the City of Scottsdale, TGen is generating answers and hope in the search for new treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer," said TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff.

Vowing to "fight pancreatic cancer, one step at a time," stepNout organizers plan to raise more than $150,000 this year on the way to eventually surpass the $1 million mark in fundraising. Participants have donated more than $750,000 since the event started in 2006 at Kiwanis Park in Tempe.

One of TGen's goals is to develop a method of early detection for pancreatic cancer. Currently, there are no tests to catch this disease in its early stages. As a result, it often is not diagnosed until its late stages, making it more difficult to treat.

Pancreatic cancer this year will take the lives of nearly 40,000 Americans, the nation's fourth-leading cause of cancer-related death.

TGen's pancreatic cancer research is led by Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, TGen's Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief, and Chief Scientific Officer for the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, a partnership with TGen.

Dr. Von Hoff is recognized as one of the world's leading authorities on pancreatic cancer. He and his team have helped develop three different treatment regimens to improve survival for people with advanced pancreatic cancer. If applied earlier, these regimens have the potential to make an even more powerful impact against the disease.

"We are proud to add stepNout to the calendar of exciting and meaningful events that call Scottsdale home. TGen is one of the most significant contributors to Scottsdale's Cure Corridor of research and medical facilities, offering world-class healthcare opportunities to residents of Scottsdale and all Arizona citizens," said Scottsdale Mayor W.J. "Jim" Lane.

Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, is a state-of the-art, 71-acre competitive sport facility offering tournament level playing conditions. The facility accommodates a variety of flat field sports such as soccer, lacrosse, football, Ultimate Frisbee and rugby. In addition to sports fields, the complex has a lighted basketball court, a shaded playground, multi-use paths, open park space and two restroom facilities.

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If you go to stepNout


What: TGen's 9th annual stepNout Run/Walk/Dash for pancreatic cancer research.

Where: Scottsdale Sports Complex, 8081 E. Princess Drive, northeast of Hayden and Bell roads, between Loop 101 and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.

When: 7-11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 2. Registration starts at 7 a.m.; races begin at 9 a.m.; an awards ceremony is set for 10 a.m.; and a kids' dash is planned for 10:30 a.m.

Cost: Registration fees range from $15 to $35, depending on age and competition. Children ages 4 and under are free.

Registration: Register at the event, or register online by Oct. 28 by visiting www.tgenfoundation.org/step.

Parking: Free.


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About TGen
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix, Arizona-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. TGen is focused on helping patients with cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes, through cutting edge translational research (the process of rapidly moving research towards patient benefit). TGen physicians and scientists work to unravel the genetic components of both common and rare complex diseases in adults and children. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities literally worldwide, TGen makes a substantial contribution to help our patients through efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. For more information, visit:www.tgen.org.

Press Contact:
Steve Yozwiak
TGen Senior Science Writer
602-343-8704
[email protected]


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