Jeremy Winkelman
Jeremy Winkelman
Jeremy Winkelman
Helios Scholar
School: University of Arizona
Hometown: Phoenix, Arizona
Mentor: Frederic Zenhausern, Ph.D., M.B.A.

 

Characterization of HuMix in Vitro Device for Studying Human Microbe Interaction in Gastrointestinal System.
Email This Article Print This Page

Characterization of HuMix in Vitro Device for Studying Human Microbe Interaction in Gastrointestinal System

Human microbiome plays a pivotal role in governing human health and disease. Recent evidence suggests that some diseases are mediated by microbial community disequilibria rather than being caused by single pathogenic strains. The gut microbiome does not only impact physiological development but also is linked to a variety of diseases. Alzheimer’s, diabetes, autism, and Parkinson’s disease have all been reported to be directly linked to the gastrointestinal microbiota. Though a few in vitro co-culture systems have been developed in studying human-microbial interaction, they all used either a Transwell or 2D cell culture system, and Caco-2, a colon cancer cell line, was tested. HuMix (human-microbial crosstalk) is a microfluidic-based co-culture device, mimicking an in vivo intestinal structure. Previously, co-culture of Caco2 cells and LGG bacteria was demonstrated. In this study, a primary human intestinal cell line, FHs 74 Int. cells was tested on HuMiX device. Successful culture of primary human intestinal epithelial cells was demonstrated with high viability and characteristics of epithelium tight junction by Live/Dead staining and anti-Occludin staining. Additionally, fluid test with new HuMix designs involving straight channel and cube channel architecture have shown promise as alternatives for the current spiral design, due to a decreased cell-gasket contact and better fluid dynamics.

Back